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20121130
20121130
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the last 40 years: ivan, dennis, katrina. and katrina i was the commander of the medical forces in pensacola, florida, and i owned the branch clinics that existed in new orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned
after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was asked to just mention if i had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to do with how to deal with community shock. two nights ago as a couple o
. so huge. and to compare it to katrina, katrina lost more lives. we lost too many lives, but not close to katrina. but in other ways it's much more devastating than katrina. right now in new york 305,000 homes are seriously damaged or gone. kirsten showed the pictures of some of them that are just gone by fire because the water systems failed, and the wind -- then the electrical systems got shorted; fire, wind. and the, so 305,000 homes seriously damaged or gone. just in new york up to now, there are going to be more that we'll learn about because the flooding is still there in lots of the basements. these are low-lying houses. there were 214,000 total homes gone in katrina of the same level of damage. businesses, 265,000 -- this is just new york. bob will talk about, and frank talked about new jersey which has similar levels of damage. in katrina 18,000 businesses. because of the density of the population, it is a much greater economic impact on our region, of course, and on the nation. than otherwise. so despite all this pain we can't entirely fault those who came before us for build
it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and very often when it comes we tray to look the other way. i believe that we have been reasonably responsive in immediate response, immediate response by doctrine and policy are military dod authorities moving out their gates into their neighborhoods when a disaster hits right next door. i mean, that seems to make sense. we have good relationships at our bases and stations and the ability to roll out and assist is something you would expect to work out pretty well. some of that has matured, in fact. in the state of california we have established a number of agreements, most particularly the wildfires where both third fleet and the expeditionary force assign helicopters in the need we are requested, it's pre-planned, o
to try this. lis? >>lis: i think so. it happened with katrina in 2005. victims sued fema and actually won. you can sue for gross negligence. it is a contract. here is what i argue to this gentleman on the screen and other people there. as a woman who had literary her roof blown off i am not unbiased on this. you have a contract with fema. we all do, to take kay of discuss protect us if a hall disaster like this. if they do not come through, which they have not in a month for many people as we have seen you can sue for breach of contract, gross negligence. >> two words: sovereign immunity you cannot sue a federal government or the agencies unless they give up a waiver. there is an exception of the gross negligence and willful conduct but that is not what he was saying, they have 475,000 people to need. for us be able to manage the catastrophe, the storm of a century, it is impossible for us to get there and give them the help they need under the immediate circumstances. >>lis: we are talking a month. >>guest: right now we have to do a look and see. >>lis: look and see? look and see? >>gue
, both lewis and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. did you discuss in this pharmaceuticals and how you would get your pharmaceuticals? >> we didn't specifically discuss it. we did i think in the shock trauma platoon know about what medications are carried on the c130, what medications were available. during the hhs presentation there was talk about the large manufacturers, if there were problems getting medications, that the federal government could facilitate that. but it is a great point. it's something locally we are working on with our pharmaceutical group because it is a big concern if we do lose supply how do we replenish that. san francisco does not have a lot of storage space so we are not able to store medications to a great extent in the area. >> i was just going to echo, our capability does come with its own internal pharmaceutical supply, although it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply process would be as we move for
disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in this room would likely be involved. but to go back, it's all -- for me it's all about relationships, it's all about communication and respecting each other's mission. we certainly appreciate our relationships with all 3 agencies up here. the last thing i would say with respect to technology, one of the thin
and was deployed to the gulf for hurricanes katrina and ike. he says even though the city has a tumultuous past, the city is ready. >> the city has resources available to them, both state and federal, so i think they're well prepared. they're watching it more so than probably half the citizens here. >> reporter: santa rosa city schools sent out a notice to parents saying that school may be cancelled tomorrow if there is excessive flooding. also, the fire department has set up sandbags at the north end of hopper street. >>> cbs 5 mark sayre is up in the north bay. what's it like right now, mark. >> reporter: the main feature here is actually the wind more so than the rain. the rain picked up in novato around 8:30. this is just off 101. around 8:30 is when the rain moved in here, ever since then it's been kind of coming down in squalls. we'd have a squall and then it would calm down a little bit, then another squall. you can only imagine, it's a whole lot higher gusts over in the hills. we can see highway 101, traffic flowing smoothly in both directions so far. a significant bite and a significa
? please come forward. >> i'm katrina, on the board of the alamo square neighborhood association. i wanted to confirm dennis's comment that we are very supportive of this. we have been following it closely. we are excited we are going to get a new irrigation system and conserve more water and will work closely with community who's communicate what is going on as the various stages happen and make that go more smoothly. we are meeting with the project manager, marvin ye, and talking about how this will affect replanting and tree removal. what we can do to really take our park to the next level. and make good decisions now as this is designed so we can have a beautiful park in 100 years. thank you. >> thank you. >> any other public comment on this item? >> good morning, commissioners. thank you for having this item on your agenda today. my name is gus hernandez, editor of the alamo square news letter. i also want to offer my support for this irrigation plant, long overdue. like commissioner bonia said. you know, we are very excited about . this we are going to be partnering with your departm
was worse than katrina. liz: it is in many respects worse than katrina, more power outages, more homes destroyed. that meeting was a mob last night. people were brought to tears. we only got $150 in insurance checks, 700 people, lashing out at both sides of the aisle, doing things like telling people the air quality is okay when it is not. this is coming at the time when the fiscal cliff negotiations, this shows a perfect example of the distractions focusing on big guzzler sodas or bicycle lanes in new york city when this is what the government should be doing, protecting people from natural disasters. stuart: why would you expect the government to be the best agency to take care of emergencies like this? is the only agency, i understand that the government does not do a good job. why do we expect them to be stellar, efficient performers? liz: clearly lowering expectations shows in disasters like this, people helping each other, charities stepping in and regular people helping each other is what this story was about. what about us? you can't let the story get out of the headlines or be
response framework. it was rewritten post katrina. and another key part of partnerships, when i was the federal on scene coordinator during deep water horizon, it's not in the national response framework, but every parish president, every mayor, every governor had a coast guard liaison officer at the oak pride and above level. so, if they didn't like how the response was going, go to my liaison officer. don't go to anderson cooper and then cause the white house to react to what they're seeing on cnn. so, how do you get in front of that news cycle? and the only way you can do that as tip o'neill said, all things in politics are local and i think we heard from vice admiral nathan that i think all responses are local as well. and, so, we really need to start most importantly at the local level, at those planning levels, because the fn, the pla change, but the partnerships need to remain constant. >> and, general baldwin, we heard from colonel span owe about now your three hats of authority, your state hat, your federal hat, and now your dual status hat. but if you could talk about
. and the evolution, the problem that came out of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no visibility on what forces are available at camp pendleton depending on your deployment cycle what fleet week can bring to bear. and we need to find a way, perhaps dcl, north palm being the broker of that, to maintain a better capabilities database so we know what is immediately available because under our old constructs, if we needed a
he is not body surfing. he knows he will be tortured and ongoing katrina. john boehner is frustrated after a closed door meeting with geithner. >> eric: brian's point, vacation is on because president obama knows he has a deal. >> dana: i don't think -- well, one, the present doesn't have a spending cut plan. why is everyone looking at us. where is your plan, sir? now the democrats are starting to realize wait, i think they are on to us. president obama sacrificed going to hawaii with his family. going to stay behind. they will fawn over him for not going to hawaii. >> bob: that happened last year. if you accept the bush tax cut last time. family went off and obama stayed behind. it's time so just accept it. >> brian: it is the same game. the house republican and the senate democrat and president is democrat. >> eric: i can't tell you how many shows i stayed until 11:59, live show for the debt creeling to hit or the government to shut down. government would shut down, 19:55 they fixed it. obama is say nothing, i need more. boehner is saying we are further than we have ever been. >> t
to become a cop. he was going to quit school when katrina hit and his parents convinced him not to drop out of school, it was finals. but he wants to give back. everybody is making a big deal. i have a sense this will be con stayous. they are overwhelming this guy. >> bob: what do you think? containous? >> dana: i hope so.- contagious. but a lot of people do things without recognition. but tourist got a photograph so we could see it and be reminded what the season, christmas season is all about. >> dana: told to tease. either one of you have anything to say? >> andrea: the nypd are some of the most amazing guys on the planet. people like to tease cops and stuff, but new york's finist is understatement. >> eric: a lot of people run toward buildings that are on fire. and toward people with guns. besides random act of kindness, also acts of heroics. >> bob: act of kindness to andrea, say one more thing. up next. ♪ note ♪ note ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ and we can save you 10% on ground shipping over the ups store. look this isn't my first christmas. these deals all seem great at the time... but later
the singest biggest car destroyer since katrina. or maybe more, given the fact that so many imparted cars were damaged near the cox of the region's rivers. tuesday morning we hear from the brothers toll. here's the best home builder in the country go. ing to tell you the story of the boom. if you remember there was a time when bob toll of toll brothers and eagles fan came on "mad money" during what turned out to be the early part of the housing collapse. he said he saw the light at the end of the tunnel. but it was most like lit light of an on-coming train. those days are gladly behind us. i suspect the toll tells a story that it goes down the fiscal cliff monday. every day is fiscal cliff tuesday, wednesday, thursday. you get the picture. anyway, you should pull the trigger here to buy it here if the fiscal cliff does what i'm afraid of. brown foreman reports wednesday. this is an interesting one. why? because goldman downgraded it to sell. just last night. i've seen this movie. they were wrong last time. they'll be wrong again. i'm going to bet them a bottle of jack daniels that will be the
from generation -- >> steve: it's bigger than katrina. >> it is in terms of the houses destroyed. yet houses that are uprooted and houses that never can be rebuilt where they are right now, you have to raise them, tremendous capital investment that has to be made. >> brian: i just think the governors and leadership have these trailers. they're already made. they just need to be delivered. no one -- >> that's not a solution. >> brian: no but it is a short-term solution because there is heat and running water because you can begin to rebuild. >> i think the frustration is less on the temporary housing housing and what the long-term slew us is. how are they going to rebuild if they don't have insurance? >> brian: i challenge you on that. it's freezing and there is no hotels. and these people need to be able to take a shower. >> steve: people living in their cars. >> brian: i'm seeing it. >> i am not going to object -- i think most of the people are housed now temporarily. i don't think the problem is for
or hurricane katrina of the housing market. maybe the public sector ought to say -- the economists say we should write the check for the treasury and we should go back to starting the future homebuyers at a price that is rational. i am willing to do a temporal cross-subsidization. i do nothing we have the political will for the financing mechanisms to pay for the bubbles when they come. i think we should do that. there are limits. limits in fairness to the future homebuyers and limits to what you can do with pricing. when the private market comes in, they're going to take those and take the business away from the fha. i will celebrate that, because that is business that the private sector should do. we are waiting for it to come in order to get them into that market. >> any changes you think the fha ought to be considering? sometimes we hear about the fha crowding out private capital. do you think there is a case to be made to bring the fha loan limits down? >> no, i do not. the product -- the problem with this point for the private sector is it is not they're not all may for the 700,000
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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